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Thoughts …. in pictures and words

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Thoughts in pictures …. thoughts in words …. Affirmations ….Quotes

 thoughts in words …. Affirmations ….Quotes

Affirmations ….Quotes

Quotes

 

Thoughts


 

believe the best forgive the rest


THE APPLE OF MY EYE

This Old English phrase was first attributed to King Aelfred (the Great) of Wessex, AD 885, inGregory’s Pastoral Care, but also appears in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

A STONE’S THROW 

This term for ‘a short distance’ is a variation of ‘a stone’s cast’, first used in early editions of the Bible, but it fell out of use. Writer John Arbuthnot revived it in The History of John Bull, in 1712.

COOL AS A CUCUMBER

Despite sounding like a modern-day phrase, Cool as a cucumber actually first appeared in John Gay’s Poems, New Song on New Similies, in 1732: “I … cool as a cucumber could see The rest of womankind.”

BUSY AS A BEE

Chaucer coined the term in the Squire’s Tale, from his Canterbury Tales, around 1386-1400.

BEE IN YOUR BONNET

This phrase was first recorded in Alexander Douglas’s Aeneis, in 1513: “Quhat bern be thou in bed with heid full of beis?”. It has been speculated that the bonnet could refer to the protective headgear beekeepers wear.

BEAT AROUND THE BUSH

Beat around the bush evolved from “beat about the bush”, a term used in birdhunting to rouse the prey out of the bushes, and into nets. Grouse hunters still use beaters today.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

Referring to the fact that two peas in a pod are identical,this phrase dates from the 16th century, and appeared in John Lyly’s Euphues and his England, in 1580: “Wher in I am not unlike unto the unskilful Painter, who having drawen the Twinnes of Hippocrates, (who wer as lyke as one peas is to an other).”

GOODY TWO SHOES

Good two shoes comes from a Christian retelling of Cinderella, a nursery tale named The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, published in 1765. The poor orphan of the title only has one shoe – but is given two shoes by a rich man as a reward for her virtue.

GREEN-EYED MONSTER

Shakespeare coined this term in The Merchant of Venice, when Portia says: “And shuddering fear, and green-eyed jealousy! O love, Be moderate;”. He then used green eyed monster again in his most famous play about jealousy – Othello.

SAVED BY THE BELL

Contrary to popular belief, this phrase didn’t priginate from the popular 90s sitcom. ‘Saved by the Bell’ is boxing slang from the late 19th century. A boxer who is in danger of losing a bout can be ‘saved’ from defeat by the bell that marks the end of a round.

DEAD RINGER

This word was used in US horse-racing at the end of the 19th century. A ‘ringer’ is a horse substituted for another of similar appearance in order to defraud the bookies.

BAD BOOKS

In the Middle Ages, ‘one’s books’ meant ‘one’s reckoning or cognisance’. So to be ‘out of someone’s books’ meant you were no longer part of their life or of interest to them.

IN SPADES

The expression ‘in spades’ , used to described a large amount, is a 20th century US word used in Bridge and card games, referring to Spades as one of the highest ranking suits.

IN STITCHES

Another Shakespeare coinage, although not used again until the 20th century. In Twelfth Night, 1602, Maria says: “If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourself into stitches, follow me.”

IN THE LIMELIGHT 

Limelight is an intense white light widely used in 19th century theatres to illuminate the stage. Clearly, actors who were the centre of attention on stage being said to be in the limelight.

IN THE BUFF

A buff-coat was a light browny/yellow leather tunic worn by English soldiers up until the 17th century. The original meaning of ‘in the buff’ was simply to be wearing such a coat. Later on, ‘in the buff’ was used to mean naked, due to the colour of the skin, which is similar to the buff coat.

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES 

This American term emerged in 1913, when Arthur (Pop) Momand started a Keep Up With The Joneses comic strip in the New York Globe. The strip was so popular in, that in 1915 a cartoon film of the same name was released.

MAD AS A HATTER 

19th century Mercury used to be used in the making of hats. This was known to have affected the nervous systems of hatters, causing them to tremble and appear insane. Mercury poisoning is still known today as ‘Mad Hatter’s disease’.

A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH 

This medieval proverb comes from the sport of falconry, where the ‘bird in the hand’ (the preying falcon) was worth more than ‘two in the bush’ – the prey.

THE ACID TEST

This term came from the California Gold Rush in the 19th century, when prospectors and dealers used acid to distinguish gold from base metal – if the metal dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid, it was real.

OFF THE RECORD 

This American phrase was first attributed to President Franklin Roosevelt in 1932, who was recorded in The Daily Times-News saying “he was going to talk ‘off the record’, that it was mighty nice to be able to talk ‘off the record’ for a change and that he hoped to be able to talk ‘off the record’ often in the future.”

 


 

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